Meet the chairman of our revived Thanet committee

David Morrish in Spain (not Thanet!) with his wife Pat

CPRE Kent sprang back to life in Thanet last autumn with the formation of a district committee, bringing to an end far too lengthy a period without a formal CPRE presence on the isle, where we have some 60 members.
At a meeting in October that attracted a healthy turnout of 16 people, David Morrish was elected chairman, and it’s a pleasure to introduce him here to a wider audience.
David was born and bred in Birmingham and had his epiphany in 1959 when despatched for a three-day Scouts expedition through the ‘Blue Remembered’ Shropshire Hills, where began his love for the tranquility of the English countryside.
At 18, he went north to study civil engineering at Leeds University, explore the dales and fells and learn the finer arts of ‘coarse rugby’. His final-year interests were traffic and transport and architecture.
After graduating, David returned to Birmingham to work for Freeman Fox as a fledgling transport planner on the West Midlands Transport Study and in new-town planning.
The latter opened the door to training as a civil engineer with Telford New Town Development Corporation in glorious Shropshire, where he met Pat, a Shropshire lass and the love of his life. The couple were married at the delightful Thomas Telford church of St Michael’s, Madeley, Telford, in 1968.
In the 1970s David and Pat moved west to Staffordshire, where David worked for local authorities on highways traffic and transport schemes. Meanwhile, the advent of three sons saw David rejoin the Scouts as a leader, with expeditions and hikes into the Peak District and Wales… and a compulsory back-to-basics camp each year in the Shropshire Hills!
His professional career ended with a proud 10 years as chief technical officer for Stafford Borough Council, where, as well as highways, drainage and other municipal engineering, David was involved in all aspects of planning and carried the can as accidental custodian of Stafford’s High House (an Elizabethan town house built in 1594 – the largest timber-framed town house in England (way bigger than any in Stratford-on-Avon!) – the ancient cottage of angler Sir Izaak Walton and Stafford’s Norman castle.
Early retirement gave David the opportunity for a variety of challenging assignments, including motorway network management at the Highways Agency, strategic public transport planning at Birmingham City Council and devising ‘recovery plans’ for the transport department at an inner London authority.
In 2015, with two of David and Pat’s sons and their families out of the UK, the couple moved 250 miles “down Watling Street” to Kent to be close to their youngest son and his family… they chose Thanet, they say, because it has the best coastline in the South East and a relaxed lifestyle.
Shortly after arriving, David became embroiled in protests against the Draft Local Plan; looking through the groups involved in consultative planning, he realised CPRE Kent offered the most cogent support and professional advice and made the decision to join and get involved.
With a group of new friends, it was decided Thanet needed its own CPRE committee to share information and offer support.
Last word to David: “I feel very honoured to have been elected as District chair and I will do my best to serve and lead us forward.
“In the three months since being elected as District chairman it has been a pleasure to have the opportunity of meeting fellow CPRE members from across Kent and to be made to feel so welcome.”

Monday, 19 March, 2018

We’re back! CPRE has a Thanet committee again

 

Thanet’s coastline again has its champions… the CPRE district committee

Thanet has a CPRE district committee again.
Sixteen people were at Monkton nature reserve on Monday afternoon (October 23) to take part in the welcome – and long overdue – revival of a committee for the isle, the only CPRE district in the county not to have been regularly represented in recent years despite having some 60 members.
David Morrish, the newly-elected chairman, gave the reasons for looking to reinstate the committee, noting how the community’s approach to planning proposals had previously been “too disjointed and piecemeal”.
He said that parish and town councils had failed to represent their electorate’s views, citing the outline planning application at Salmestone as “a blatant example” of this.
Geoff Orton, who will be district secretary, told the meeting that almost three years ago a meeting in Pierremont Hall, Broadstairs, had been addressed by CPRE Kent director Hilary Newport and senior planner Brian Lloyd, expressing reservations about Thanet’s ability to cope with a then-target of some 12,000 new houses. Now, with new planning methodology in the pipeline, that figure was likely to be close to a staggering 24,000.
If ever Thanet needed a strong CPRE presence, it is clearly now!
Other officers to be voted in were Suzanne Brimm as vice-chair and Colin Bridge as treasurer, while Peter Lorenzo, Alan Gimes, Craig Solly, Mrs M Bawden, Bernard Clayson, Natasha Ransom, Beth Johnson and Sonya Smyth all agreed to stand on the committee, meaning CPRE Thanet had a healthy coverage across the isle.
Finally, it was agreed that in principle Thanet CPRE should aim to meet on the last Monday of every month and, to accommodate as many people as possible, at 6pm. This, of course, might be subject to change on occasion.
Thanet Countryside Trust, which owns Monkton nature reserve, was thanked for its hospitality.
The date of the next meeting, again at Monkton nature reserve, is Monday, November 27, at 6pm.

Friday, October 27, 2017

Thanet Local Plan Consultation

We have set out our concerns about the unrealistic and damagingly high target for new homes and jobs in the draft Thanet Local Plan.

The plan sets a target of 5,000 new jobs. We believe this is unachievable, mainly because the catalyst for growth on which it is based – Manston Airport – has gone. We are advocating a lower target of 3,100 jobs and this would mean the housing target could be reduced.

The housing target of 12,000 new homes is based on population information that is out of date and unreliable. It fails to take account of housing proposed in neighbouring districts – especially Dover. Dover has already set a high growth housing target of 14,000 new homes. In addition, Dover District Council has recently granted planning permission for even more houses – including 500 at the Discovery Park. The Dover and Thanet housing markets are closely aligned, and we believe that Dover will inevitably meet some of the Thanet housing need. This has not been taken into account in Thanet District Council’s assessment of housing need. Continue reading