Lower Thames Crossing: rallying call to take part in next phase of consultation

Four-week consultation starts on Tuesday, July 14

The next phase of consultation on the proposed Lower Thames Crossing begins this month.
Highways England is launching the four-week consultation on proposed design refinements to the planned road on Tuesday, July 14. It comes after 2018’s statutory consultation in 2018 and the supplementary consultation, which was completed this year.
From July 14, we will all be able to comment on the proposed refinements, which include:

  • Minor refinements to elements of the highways design
  • Updated paths for walkers, cyclists and horse riders
  • Proposals for redirecting and upgrading utilities
  • More detailed landscaping proposals
  • Further developed ecological mitigation measures

The consultation is a digital-first event, meaning that from July 14 to Wednesday, August 12, all materials, including an online feedback form, will be accessible here
You can also order printed copies of the consultation materials by emailing info@lowerthamescrossing.co.uk
The digital-first approach reflects social-distancing restrictions imposed by the government in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Highways England says it is, though, setting up additional measures to ensure the public can engage in the consultation. These include:

  • Leaflets distributed to 135,000 properties within two kilometres of the route, giving residents notice of the consultation
  • From now, people can register their interest in the consultation and order hard copies of the consultation packs to arrive from the July 14 launch
  • Extensive media and social-media campaigns to raise awareness of the consultation

Highways England says that during the consultation period, July 14-August 12, it will provide:

  • Freephone consultation and call-back service for people to find out more and give their feedback on the proposals
  • Online public information exhibition, including videos, displays and documents library
  • Webinars to explain the key changes open to all members of the public
  • Updated and newly-interactive website
  • Social-media updates

Alex Hills, CPRE Kent’s Gravesham district chairman, said: “This could be the last consultation before a planning application is put in, so it is important that as many people as possible take part in this very short consultation.
“CPRE Kent is calling on people and organisations to order hard copies of the consultation for those who are not comfortable doing everything online.”

For more on the Lower Thames Crossing, see here and here

Friday, July 3, 2020

Thames Crossing consultation extended to April 2

More time to have your say…

Public consultation on the proposed Lower Thames Crossing has been extended until Thursday, April 2.
A spokesman for Highways England said: “As a result of cancelling our last public information event and our remaining three mobile information centres, we recognise that some people may have not yet had the opportunity to speak to the team at an event.
“We are also conscious that the attentions of people and organisations will have been focused elsewhere over the past few days. Therefore we have taken the decision to extend the consultation until 23.59 on Thursday 2 April. 
“This is to give people additional time to complete their consultation response and to enable organisations to complete their governance processes, which may have been disrupted.
“Until that time people can continue to share their views online here, (www.lowerthamescrossing.co.uk/consultation-2020) by submitting a paper response form to Freepost LTC CONSULTATION or by emailing ltc.consultation@traverse.ltd”
Highways England is also opening a phone service for those who had planned to go to the remaining consultation events. Sessions will run from 2pm-8pm on Monday, March 23, and Wednesday, March 25; call 020 3787 4300.
CPRE Kent has already put together a substantive response to the consultation, which had been due to end on Wednesday, March 25.

  • To read more from Highways England on the project and the consultation extension, click here

NPPF consultation: forget the unwieldy title, this matters and you can influence it

The beauty of Walland Marsh (pic Richard Watkins, flickr)

National Planning Policy Framework… it’s an ugly brute of a name.
Even its shortcut, the NPPF, takes some tongue-twisting getting used to. But it is an important beast and plays a bigger part in our lives than many might think.
To put it at its simplest, the NPPF (we’ll stick with that for now) is the government’s planning rulebook.
It helps determine the principles of countryside protection, the delivery of affordable housing, the provision of infrastructure, the places from where we draw our minerals and aggregates – and very much more.
And right now the NPPF is being consulted upon, because it is going to change. And how it changes will affect us all.
A key driver of the proposed change is what is commonly referred to in the media as ‘the housing crisis’.
CPRE is the first to highlight the fact that too many people are excluded from the housing ladder, while homelessness is an undeniable problem in this country.
However, we don’t believe that the proposed changes, or reforms, to the NPPF will do enough to tackle those issues. Indeed, we suspect that while communities’ needs go unmet, the only people who will really benefit are housebuilders.
It’s a problem caused by the government’s misunderstanding of housing issues and its subsequent weakening of planning rules in a bid to encourage developers.
The ‘crisis’ is of course one of affordability and won’t be addressed by simply building more houses, which is the government’s current approach. Rather, it is a case of the type of homes we build, for whom we build them and where.
‘The right homes in the right places’ has long been a CPRE mantra, and we believe it is possible to build the homes England needs without swathes of our countryside being sacrificed.
We advocate ‘sustainable development’ (the last bit of jargon – honest!) that:

  • Supports local democracy by adhering to neighbourhood and local plans
  • Ensures realistic and high-quality development based on genuine need, not market demand
  • Delivers more affordable homes by closing legal loopholes that put developer profits first
  • Adopts a true ‘brownfield first’ approach to development
  • Protects our countryside for current and future generations

Many organisations, communities and individuals with many agendas are contributing to the NPPF consultation, and it is vital that CPRE and those who agree with our outlook also make their views known.
The future of the countryside you hold dearest could depend on the changes made to the NPPF, so we urge you to join us in fighting for the best possible outcome, for the countryside, for wildlife – and for people.
We’re asking you to write to your MP, asking them to put communities at the heart for the planning system in the revised NPPF.
You can do that here
Alternatively, given that some MPs do not respond to formatted messages, you might choose to write to them individually.
It is difficult to overstate the importance of this consultation. For those of us who love the countryside – indeed those of us who love this country, its people and its traditions – the new-look NPPF will have an impact way beyond anything its cumbersome name might suggest.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Re-balancing the Renewables Obligation

Solar Farm Energy Production Kent

We very much welcome the announcement today of a consultation on changes to financial support for solar PV, which will re-direct support from the feed-in tariffs away from large (more than 5MW) solar generation installations and towards smaller arrays.
The Solar industry has done a great deal to drive down the costs and drive up the efficiency of solar PV generation, and this has helped drive the proliferation of large scale solar PV facilities being sited on productive agricultural land.  We believe that there is much more to be done in making the built environment more attractive to solar power generation and if these changes help achieve that, then so much to the good.

Read more here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/ensuring-value-for-money-and-maintaining-investment-in-renewable-energy